What Does Inclusive Design Mean?

Why is accessibilty seen as an after-thought, or at worst an expense to help a handful of disadvantaged people?

Have you ever tried using a website or app on your smartphone whilst riding a bus when the sun is streaming through the window? You probably have. How did that work out for you?

…the internet was no longer being consumed solely on a desktop, viewing through a large monitor perched on a desk whilst in a comfortable chair. The iPhone broke a barrier. The web would start – and continues – to push its way into every moment of our day, regardless of what environment (surroundings or situation) you happen to be in.

microsoft inclusive design impairments

It’s lunch time at the Accessibility Scotland Conference and I take a stroll up the road to grab a soda. I find a shop and low and behold a 10cm step. With the challenges that wheelchairs users have fresh in my mind, I looked down, shook my head and walked on in.

The 10cm step

accessibility ramp at shop

On my way out a ramp appears! “Well that solves that”. I am then greeted by a delivery man with a trolley full of supplies for the shop. The ramp belonged to him. He finished his delivery, threw the ramp in the back of his truck and drove away. Leaving me with the 10cm step. So not only would consideration help those we would often think to require the support (those in wheelchairs, those with limited visibility or even those with prams) but it would help the main function of the shop – getting supplies in both quicker and easier – but also be less intrusive to all users.

So, what’s the digital equivalent of the 10cm step?

There’s a few. For example, the contrast between text and background. Dark colours on a light background work well for users with visual impairments but also work well for “able-bodied” users reading a phone with bright sunlight glaring off the screen.

What about the move towards ‘smart homes’ and the invisible interfaces such as Alexa and Siri? How accessible are they? Users that are mute (permanent impairment) or users with laryngitis (temporary impairment) will struggle to communicate with them. But also those, like myself, with a strong accent (situational impairment) that will struggle with these new technologies.

How do we take this forward?

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: What Does Inclusive Design Mean? – Storm ID Blog

Your Users Might Not be as Tech-Savvy as You Think

Thanks to their specialist skillsets and proximity to a given project, UX Designers are set apart from the majority of their target audience. As Jakob Nielsen explains, “one of usability’s most hard-earned lessons is that you are not the user. This is why it’s a disaster to guess at the users’ needs.” However, there’s another fundamental ability that can be damaging to assume of your user: Computer literacy.

As the Norman Nielsen Group concludes, “if you think something is easy, or that ‘surely people can do this simple thing on our website,’ then you may very well be wrong.”

How does this impact your UX choices?

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Your Users Might Not be as Tech-Savvy as You Think – Usabilla Blog

UI Options 

UI OptionsObjectiveEasily add UI Options to your website. Add a simple separated-panel preferences editor to any page.DescriptionUI Options adds a simple preferences editor dialog with a set of six panels in a collapsible panel at the top of the page, accessible through a button in the upper right corner of the page.

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Read full article at Source: UI Options | GPII DeveloperSpace

How Current Design Trends Impact Web Accessibility

Hands sketching a website layout on a digital tablet, meant to illustrate a UX Designer working to create a layout with web accessibility and inclusive design in mind.

“You are not your users.”
“Involve people with disabilities in user testing.”
“The average user does not exist.”
“Design for the extremes, and the middle will take care of itself.”

We hear these phrases all the time, yet a lot of people still believe that accessibility is mostly a quality assurance or developer’s responsibility, something they should only have to think about when the actual coding phase begins. But some of the really impactful decisions that make or break accessibility for people with disabilities and seniors are, in fact, made during the design phase.

Yes, you read that right. Let me rephrase it for you: a lot of the accessibility issues that people run into on our sites and applications are caused by uneducated decisions made during the design phase. You and I have the power to do something about that.

In this post, we’ll explore some of the design trends we increasingly run into on the Web today, and how decisions made during the design phases can have a hugely detrimental effect on anyone who uses the web in a slightly differently way. But first…

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Read full article at Source: How Current Design Trends Impact Web Accessibility

Best Color Contrast Checkers for Accessibility Testing

Whether you are designing, developing, testing or auditing, a contrast ratio checker is the best way to ensure your site or app passes accessibility criteria. As a designer you can use a simple value checker to plug in foreground and background color value as you use them. You could also use other tools to check final design designs in their entirety. As a developer or someone conducting a website accessibility audit, you’ll likely want to use tools that can check completed web pages.

Contrast Ratio Requirements for Text in WCAG 2.0 Level AA & AAA

Accessibility Color Contrast Example
When designing or developing accessible websites, web applications or mobile apps, it may be obvious that text should be very legible. After all, the more difficulty user have reading your information, the less likely they are to interact, engage, purchase or take whatever other action you consider key to success. This is doubly so when developing for persons with low-vision.

The Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0 stipulate two minimum contrast ratios between text and its background color on websites, applications or mobile apps.

To meet the level AA success criteria text smaller than 18 point (or 14 point if bold) must have a 4.5:1 contrast ratio. All larger text must have a contrast ratio of 3:1 or greater.

The more stringent AAA criteria the requires text under 18 point (or 14 point if bold) to exceed a contrast ratio of 7:1. All larger text must have a contrast ratio of at least 4.5:1.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Best Color Contrast Checkers for Accessibility Testing – Vance Bell, Philadelphia, PA

Writing CSS with Accessibility in Mind

An introduction to web accessibility. Tips on how to improve the accessibility of your web sites and apps with CSS.

… a lot of things have changed and CSS now gives us an incredible set of tools to style the web. We went from Verdana to Webfonts, from fixed widths to Responsive Web Design, from table-based layouts to Grid, and we don’t have to use images anymore for borders, fonts or shadows. We have custom propertiesFeature Queriescalc() and numerous new units. This of course is only a subset of the great developments of the last years.

Writing CSS with Accessibility in Mind

While this wide range of properties and endless ways of solving tasks with CSS makes our lives easier, it also creates the potential to worsen the experience for our users. It’s actually possible to make a website inaccessible in just three lines of CSS.

In this post I’ve collected techniques, considerations and approaches that will help you write more accessible CSS. The collection starts with basic concepts and well-known properties and covers some of the newer stuff at the end.

In the end it got way bigger than expected, so here’s a handy menu so you can jump directly to a section that interests you the most:

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Writing CSS with Accessibility in Mind – Manuel Matuzovic – Medium