Accessibility in Office 365—enabling greater digital inclusion – Office Blogs

The 2016 International Day of Persons with Disabilities (IDPD), focuses on laying the foundation for a future of greater inclusion for persons with disabilities. In honor of IDPD, we invite all Office 365 customers to lay the foundation for a more inclusive digital environment by discovering and using accessibility capabilities built into Office 365.

Create accessible content with Office 365

Office 365 empowers you to communicate information to your colleagues and customers in a variety of ways: documents, presentations, spreadsheets, emails, chats, sways, notes, videos and more. As you communicate, it is important to meet the diverse needs of your audience. Making your content accessible ensures it can be used without barriers by people with varying levels of vision, hearing, cognition and mobility.

Q. How can I get help with accessibility issues?A. Visit the Office Accessibility Center to find support articles on creating accessible content with Office 365 applications on various platforms or on using Office 365 applications with specific assistive technologies. If you require further assistance, reach out to an accessibility specialist via the Enterprise Disability Answer Desk or Consumer Disability Answer Desk.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Accessibility in Office 365—enabling greater digital inclusion – Office Blogs

Apple brings AirPod-style streaming, Live Listen accessibility to MFi hearing aids

 

Apple has enhanced its iOS accessibility features for users with hearing impairments, adapting its enhanced Bluetooth-based streaming to Made For iPhone hearing aids while introducing Live Listen, a feature that uses an iPhone’s mic to focus on conversations in loud environments.

 

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Apple brings AirPod-style streaming, Live Listen accessibility to MFi hearing aids

17 Adjustments You Can Make to Your Website  for Better Accessibility

Web developer Mary Gillen shares 17 adjustments you can make to your website today that make it more accessible to visitors with disabilities. WCAG 2.0

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: 17 Adjustments You Can Make to Your Website Today That Make It More17 Website Adjustments You Can Make Today for Better Accessibility Accessible to Visitors with Disabilities |

How to Describe Complex Designs for Users with Disabilities – Salesforce UX

You’re a developer who has just been handed a complex design spec. You know the designs support accessibility because your UX team read a…

in Section 508 contains one very sage suggestion. It states that,

“… sufficient information about a user interface element including the identity, operation and state of the element shall be available to assistive technology.”

Originally written for software, these words are even more relevant today given the prevalence of web based applications. They describe the type of information users with disabilities need in order to successfully complete a task. This could be a blind user with a screen reader, a voice input user with a physical disability, or any number of other types of users with a variety of assistive technologies.

The basic fundamentals of making any interaction accessible with both the keyboard and for screen reader users comes down to providing three basic pieces of information: identity, operation, and state.

Users interacting with an element as basic as a checkbox, or as complex as drag and drop experience, have to consider these three questions:

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: How to Describe Complex Designs for Users with Disabilities – Salesforce UX – Medium

Some tough love: Stop the excuses, already.

Over a year ago, Dale Cruse called me “militant” about accessibility. I know I use strong language at times, but I actively try to have a softer touch. I think he meant it kindly anyway…

The core Web technologies necessary to make web content accessible are not new. The needs of users with disabilities aren’t new. If any of these topics are new to you, that’s fine. Fucking learn them.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Some tough love: Stop the excuses, already.

3 steps to fulfill 80% standards with 20% effort


3 steps to fulfill 80% standards with 20% effort

Make your website usable with keyboard only: make sure that focus outline is visible all the time and user can determine which element is currently focusedno extra/unnecessary TAB stopsno tabstop traps (when you cannot get out of an element with the keyboard)

Implement smart focus management:
set focus on appropriate elements after user actions (e.g., when a user navigates to a page with a login form – set the focus on the login text field; in 90% of the cases the next user action will be entering the login)restore focus to appropriate elements after user actions (e.g., when a user closes a menu, focus should be restored to the element that was focused on before opening the menu)make tab order user-friendly (remove non-actionable and non-informative tab stops)

Make your website usable with screen reader:

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Web Accessibility Hacker Way

Dos and don’ts on designing for accessibility | Accessibility | Posters

Dos and don’ts on designing for accessibility

Karwai Pun, 2 September 2016 — Design, User research

Karwai Pun is an interaction designer currently working on Service Optimisation to make existing and new services better for our users. Karwai is part of an accessibility group at Home Office Digital, leading on autism, and has created these dos and don’ts posters as a way of approaching accessibility from a design perspective.

Dos and don’ts

The dos and don’ts of designing for accessibility are general guidelines, best design practices for making our services accessible. Currently, we have six different posters in our series that cater to users from these areas: low vision, deaf and hard of hearing, dyslexia, those with motor disabilities, users on the autistic spectrum and users of screen readers.

Curated by (Lifekludger)
Read full article at Source: Dos and don’ts on designing for accessibility | Accessibility